Layout is a design step that can make or break any design. Especially in graphic design where the layout of your 2 dimensional objects on a blank surface is really all you have to work with. Most of the time, turning snap to grid on and changing the size of the grid can help a lot when figuring out where your guides are going to be and ultimately, where the objects will go on your piece. The question I’m bringing up that relates to this process is, are you moving the objects or changing the position of the space around them? Because space is something, and is measurable, who is to say that layout isn’t the process of changing the location of space? It could be interesting to use a program where you can’t actually move objects on the page but actually move the space. The objects would be “pushed” around like a gridlock game.

Sure there would be limitations to this method, because after the initial layout of your poster, card, UI, or whatever you’re working on, there is a step where you “nudge” the objects a little just to put them in the exact position you want, at least sometimes. But, I think that someone like myself who has really only been starting to learn layout, could learn about moving empty space in a whole new way if I were to practice using the method. The work I produce later on in my career may reflect this learning in a way that shows lots of empty space. I’m thinking it would, only because the websites I build now are composed of a lot of open space. Minimalist I’m sure, would understand the importance of this “moving space” method to layout. “Design should be simple” – Dieter Rams. I believe this may be true, but only from a user standpoint. In my words, if you can find complication in a simplistic layout due to the space around the object(s), I believe the design is strong.